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Artificial Intelligence and Law

, Volume 1, Issue 1, pp 65–86 | Cite as

Isomorphism and legal knowledge based systems

  • T. J. M. Bench-Capon
  • F. P. Coenen
Article

Abstract

This paper discusses some engineering considerations that should be taken into account when building a knowledge based system, and recommends isomorphism, the well defined correspondence of the knowledge base to the source texts, as a basic principle of system construction in the legal domain. Isomorphism, as it has been used in the field of legal knowledge based systems, is characterised and the benefits which stem from its use are described. Some objections to and limitations of the approach are discussed. The paper concludes with a case study giving a detailed example of the use of the isomorphic approach in a particular application.

Key words

legal knowledge based systems maintenance isomorphism 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. J. M. Bench-Capon
    • 1
  • F. P. Coenen
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Computer ScienceUniversity of Liver poolLiverpoolEngland

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