HEC Forum

, Volume 1, Issue 3, pp 137–150

Improving Hospital Ethics Committees: Cross cultural concerns and their procedural implications

  • Dorothy C. Rasinski-Gregory
  • Ronald B. Miller
  • Fredric R. Kutner
Article

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Copyright information

© Pergamon Press plc 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dorothy C. Rasinski-Gregory
  • Ronald B. Miller
  • Fredric R. Kutner

There are no affiliations available

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