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Journal of Risk and Uncertainty

, Volume 13, Issue 3, pp 277–291 | Cite as

The pain of road-accident victims and the bereavement of their relatives: A contingent-valuation experiment

  • Nathalie G. Schwab Christe
  • Nils C. Soguel
Article

Abstract

The accurate description of the contingent market is a necessary condition for eliciting willingness-to-pay values. So far, however, the contingent market for a reduction in the risk of being the victim of a road accident has only been broadly specified. This Swiss experiment attempts to define the good to be purchased by respondents with greater precision. It concentrates on the human costs of road accidents, i.e., pain, suffering, and bereavement. Respondents were asked to consider themselves either as potential victims of a road accident or as relatives of potential victims and to state their willingness to pay to reduce the likelihood of such an accident occurring.

Key words

contingent valuation road accident human costs victims and relatives 

JEL Classification

D61—Allocative Efficiency Cost-Benefit Analysis I12—Mortality, Morbidity Disability, J17—Value of Life J28—Safety, Accidents 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nathalie G. Schwab Christe
    • 1
  • Nils C. Soguel
    • 2
  1. 1.Institut de recherches économiques et régionales (IRER)University of NeuchâtelNeuchâtelSwitzerland
  2. 2.Institut de hautes études en administration publique (IDHEAP)University of LausanneChavannes-près-RenensSwitzerland

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