International Journal of Computer Vision

, Volume 4, Issue 3, pp 171–183 | Cite as

Structure from motion using line correspondences

  • Minas E. Spetsakis
  • John (Yiannis) Aloimonos
Article

Abstract

A theory is presented for the computation of three-dimensional motion and structure from dynamic imagery, using only line correspondences. The traditional approach of corresponding microfeatures (interesting points-highlights, corners, high-curvature points, etc.) is reviewed and its shortcomings are discussed. Then, a theory is presented that describes a closed form solution to the motion and structure determination problem from line correspondences in three views. The theory is compared with previous ones that are based on nonlinear equations and iterative methods.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Minas E. Spetsakis
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • John (Yiannis) Aloimonos
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Computer Vision Laboratory, Center for Automation ResearchUniversity of MarylandCollege Park
  2. 2.Department of Computer ScienceUniversity of MarylandCollege Park
  3. 3.Institute for Advanced Computer StudiesUniversity of MarylandCollege Park

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