Journal of Atmospheric Chemistry

, Volume 25, Issue 3, pp 289–305

Fourier transform measurement of NO2 absorption cross-section in the visible range at room temperature

  • A. C. Vandaele
  • C. Hermans
  • P. C. Simon
  • M. Van Roozendael
  • J. M. Guilmot
  • M. Carleer
  • R. Colin
Article

Abstract

New laboratory measurements of NO2 absorption cross-section were performed using a Fourier transform spectrometer at 2 and 16 cm-1 (0.03 and 0.26 nm at 400 nm) in the visible range (380–830 nm) and at room temperature. The use of a Fourier transform spectrometer leads to a very accurate wavenumber scale (0.005 cm-1, 8×10-5 nm at 400 nm). The uncertainty on the new measurements is better than 4%. Absolute and differential cross-sections are compared with published data, giving an agreement ranging from 2 to 5% for the absolute values. The discrepancies in the differential cross-sections can however reach 18%. The influence of the cross-sections on the ground-based measurement of the stratospheric NO2 total amount is also investigated.

Key words

Fourier transform spectroscopy NO2 absorption cross-sections differential absorption cross-sections visible stratospheric and tropospheric measurements 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. C. Vandaele
    • 1
  • C. Hermans
    • 1
  • P. C. Simon
    • 1
  • M. Van Roozendael
    • 1
  • J. M. Guilmot
    • 2
  • M. Carleer
    • 2
  • R. Colin
    • 2
  1. 1.Institut d'Aéronomie Spatiale de BelgiqueBruselsBelgium
  2. 2.Laboratoire de Chimie PhysiqueUniversité Libre de BruxellesBrusselsBelgium

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