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Agroforestry Systems

, Volume 13, Issue 3, pp 203–224 | Cite as

Design and development of agroforestry systems for Illinois, USA: silvicultural and economic considerations

  • G. E. Campbell
  • G. J. Lottes
  • J. O. Dawson
Article

Abstract

Recommended managerial inputs and associated outputs expected from practicing agroforestry on marginal farm lands in the central USA are discussed. Modeled management combinations are based on five timber species, three sites indices, three timber growth rates, five agricultural crops, all common crop rotations, and three tillage systems. Black walnut (Juglans nigra L.), combined with row crop production, is used to illustrate a specific multicropping alternative. Based on net present value, modeled agroforestry systems incorporating black walnut performed better on the better sites and at the medium to high timber growth rates whereas management systems using red oak (Quercus rubra L.) with row crops performed better on the poorer sites and at the lower growth rates. For agroforestry to be competitive with traditional agriculture, medium to high timber growth rates were necessary. Also, lower interest rates and the existing U.S. income tax structure favored agroforestry versus traditional agriculture. Substantial increases in net income may be possible through incorporating other income producing activities such as nut production within the agroforestry system.

Key words

Multicropping joint production marginal land timber and agriculture net present value income taxation 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. E. Campbell
    • 1
  • G. J. Lottes
    • 1
  • J. O. Dawson
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Forestry, 110 Mumford HallUniversity of Illinois at Urbana-ChampaignUrbanaUSA

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