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Instructional Science

, Volume 13, Issue 2, pp 141–158 | Cite as

From behaviourism to cognitive behaviourism to cognitive development: Steps in the evolution of instructional design

  • Robbie Case
  • Carl Bereiter
Article

Abstract

The recent history of instructional technology is traced, starting with the work of Skinner, moving on to the task analytic approach of Gagné, and following through to contemporary efforts associated with the “cognitive revolution.” It is suggested that an understanding of the process of cognitive development may enable us to build on and improve earlier approaches, by adapting them more directly to students' current levels of cognitive development, and by ensuring that we do not overtax their information processing capabilities. To illustrate and support this claim, a number of recent instructional studies are cited, some of which have utilized classic developmental tasks, and some of which have utilized conventional classroom material.

Keywords

Information Processing Analytic Approach Current Level Cognitive Development Instructional Design 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Elsevier Science Publishers B.V. 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robbie Case
    • 1
  • Carl Bereiter
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Applied Cognitive ScienceOntario Institute for Studies in EducationTorontoCanada

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