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Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry

, Volume 13, Issue 4, pp 391–403 | Cite as

Anxiety disorders in Japan: A Review of The Japanese literature on Shinkeishitsu and taijinkyōfushī

  • John G. Russell
Article

Abstract

As culture-bound syndromes, Japanese shinkeishitsu (“constitutional neurasthenia”) and taijinkyōfushō (“anthropophobia”) have received considerable attention in the Japanese literature. While these disorders are viewed as diagnostically distinct from Western psychiatric categories, recent studies by the Japanese suggest some affinity with Western social phobias, depression, and schizophrenia. The paper reviews this literature and offers suggestions for further cross-cultural research.

Keywords

Schizophrenia Anxiety Disorder Social Phobia Japanese Literature Psychiatric Category 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • John G. Russell
    • 1
  1. 1.Nishiwaseda Shinjuku-ku, TokyoJapan

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