Cancer Causes & Control

, Volume 6, Issue 1, pp 14–23 | Cite as

Subsite-specific risk factors for colorectal cancer: a hospital-based case-control study in Japan

  • Manami Inoue
  • Kazuo Tajima
  • Kaoru Hirose
  • Nobuyuki Hamajima
  • Toshiro Takezaki
  • Takashi Hirai
  • Tomoyuki Kato
  • Yoshiyuki Ohno
Research Papers

Abstract

To investigate the subsite-specific risk factors for colorectal cancer, we conducted a case-control study, using a common questionnaire which inquired about general lifestyles over the past five years (1988–92), at the Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya, Japan. This study compared 432 patients with histopathologically diagnosed colorectal cancer (94 proximal colon [cecum, ascending colon, transverse colon]; 137 distal colon [descending colon, sigmoid colon]; 201 rectum [rectosigmoid, rectum]); and 31,782 first-visit outpatient controls who were free from cancer. In both genders, habitual smoking selectively increased the risk for rectum cancer. Soft or loose feces increased the risk for all subsites of colorectal cancer, particularly in female cancer (odds ratio [OR]=4.5). Among female dietary habits, Japanese-style foods decreased the risk factors for distal colon cancer, but increased the risk for proximal colon cancer. These results suggested that the risk factors for colorectal cancer differ by subsite among such a low-risk population as the Japanese. It is suggested also that ‘irritable bowel’ (soft or loose feces) might be associated with distal subsites of colorectal cancer, independently or combined with habitual smoking. Cancer Causes and Control 1995, 6, 14–22.

Key words

Case-control study colorectal cancer Japan risk factors subsite 

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Copyright information

© Rapid Communications of Oxford Ltd 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Manami Inoue
  • Kazuo Tajima
  • Kaoru Hirose
  • Nobuyuki Hamajima
  • Toshiro Takezaki
  • Takashi Hirai
  • Tomoyuki Kato
  • Yoshiyuki Ohno

There are no affiliations available

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