Hydrobiologia

, Volume 186, Issue 1, pp 415–421

Effect of incubation and preservation on resting egg hatching and mixis in the derived clones of the rotifer Brachionus plicatilis

  • Atsushi Hagiwara
  • Akinori Hino
Article

Abstract

The marine rotifer Brachionus plicatilis typicus (Clone 8105A, Univ. of Tokyo) was cultured in 500 ml beakers to form resting eggs. Tetraselmis tetrathele was used as a culture food. Just after formation, resting eggs were exposed to various temperature (5–25 °C) and light regimes (24L: OD and OL : 24D). When eggs were exposed to light just after formation, the eggs hatched sporadically over a month. No hatching was observed for six months when eggs were preserved under dark conditions regardless of the temperature. These eggs hatched simultaneously after being exposed to light and eggs preserved at 5 °C showed twice as high hatching rate (40%) as that of eggs preserved at 15–25 °C (24%). Clones from resting eggs that were kept under different temperature and light regimes were reared individually to the third generation. Incubation at 25 °C with lighting produced the highest (5.4% and 5.2 %) rate of mictic females during their 2nd and 3rd generations, respectively. The lowest rates (0 and 1.5%) were found when the eggs were kept at 5 °C in total darkness for six months. A lower rate of amictic female production was found in clones with higher rates of mixis.

Key words

Rotifera resting eggs light temperature hatching mixis 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Atsushi Hagiwara
    • 1
  • Akinori Hino
    • 2
  1. 1.Graduate School of Marine Science & EngineeringNagasaki UniversityNagasakiJapan
  2. 2.Department of Fisheries, Faculty of AgricultureThe University of TokyoTokyo 113Japan

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