Hydrobiologia

, Volume 81, Issue 1, pp 87–111

8. Occurrence of benthic microbial mats in saline lakes

  • J. Bauld
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© Dr W. Junk Publishers 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Bauld
    • 1
  1. 1.Baas Becking Geobiological Lab.CSIRO Fuel Geoscience UnitCanberra CityAustralia

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