Plant Cell, Tissue and Organ Culture

, Volume 40, Issue 3, pp 289–291 | Cite as

In vitro propagation of the leguminous tree Swartzia madagascariensis

  • Karin Berger
  • Willi Schaffner
Research Note

Abstract

Shoot induction frequency for the leguminous tree Swartzia madagascariensis Desv. was higher on MS and WP media than on B5. Explants incubated on media solidified with agar produced more shoots with a lower tendency to hyperhydricity than explants on agarose or Gelrite media. Maximum shoot induction was obtained with an agar-solidified MS medium containing 2.2 μM benzyladenine (37 shoots/explant). Shoots rooted after transfer to half-strength MS medium supplemented with 26.8 μM naphthaleneacetic acid.

Key words

micropropagation rooting shoot induction 

Abbreviations

BA

benzyladenine

IBA

indolebutyric acid

NAA

naphthaleneacetic acid

WP(M)

woody plant (medium)

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Gamborg OL, Miller RA & Ojima K (1968) Nutrient requirements of suspension cultures of soybean root cells. Exp. Cell Res. 50: 151–158.Google Scholar
  2. Gaspar T, Kevers C, Debergh P, Maene L, Paques M & Boxus P (1987) Vitrification: morphological, physiological and ecological aspects. In: Bonga JM & Durzan DJ (Eds) Cell and Tissue Culture in Forestry, Vol 1 (pp 152–166). M. Nijhoff Publ., DordrechtGoogle Scholar
  3. Lloyd GB & McCown BH (1981) Commercially feasible micropropagation of mountain laurel (Kalmia latifolia) by use of shoot tip culture. Comb. Proc. Int. Plant Propagators Soc. 30: 421–437.Google Scholar
  4. MacRae S & Van Staden J (1990) In vitro culture of Eucalyptus grandis: effect of gelling agents on propagation. J. Plant Physiol. 137: 249–251.Google Scholar
  5. McCown BH & Sellmer JC (1987) General media and vessels suitable for woody plant culture. In: Bonga JM & Durzan DJ (Eds) Cell and Tissue Culture in Forestry, Vol 1 (pp 4–16) M. Nijhoff Publ., DordrechtGoogle Scholar
  6. McCown DD & McCown BH (1987) North American hardwoods. In: Bonga JM & Durzan DJ (Eds) Cell and Tissue Culture in Forestry, Vol 3 (pp 247–260). M. Nijhoff Publ., DordrechtGoogle Scholar
  7. Murashige T & Skoog F (1962) A revised medium for rapid growth and bioassays with tobacco tissue cultures. Physiol. Plant. 15: 473–497Google Scholar
  8. Scherer PA, Müller E, Lippert H & Wolff G (1988) Multielement analysis of agar and gelrite impurities in vestigated by inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometry as well as physical properties of tissue culture media prepared with agar or the gellan gum gelrite. Acta Hort. 226: 655–658Google Scholar
  9. Suter R, Tanner M, Borel C, Hostettmann K & Freyvogel TA (1986) Laboratory and field trials at Ifakara (Kilombero district, Tanzania) on the plant molluscicide Swartzia madagascariensis. Acta Tropica 43: 69–83Google Scholar
  10. Ziv M (1991) Vitrification: morphological and physiological disorders of in vitro plants. In: Debergh PC & Zimmerman RH (Eds) Micropropagation: Technology and Application (pp 45–69). Kluwer Academic Publ., DordrechtGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Karin Berger
    • 1
  • Willi Schaffner
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Pharmacy, Division Pharmaceutical BiologyUniversity of BaselBaselSwitzerland

Personalised recommendations