Vegetatio

, Volume 65, Issue 2, pp 95–98

Species richness and distortion in reciprocal averaging and detrended correspondence analysis

  • T. C. D. Dargie
Article

Abstract

Gradients in beta diversity and species richness cause different forms of distortion in reciprocal averaging ordinations. Detrended correspondence analysis largely removes the beta diversity effect and reduces, but does not eliminate, the influence of species richness.

Keywords

Detrended correspondence analysis Reciprocal averaging Species diversity Vegetation models 

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References

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Copyright information

© Dr W. Junk Publishers 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. C. D. Dargie
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of GeographyThe UniversitySheffieldUnited Kingdom

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