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Plant Growth Regulation

, Volume 20, Issue 3, pp 271–277 | Cite as

Variations in abscisic acid, indole-3-acetic acid and zeatin riboside concentrations in two Mediterranean shrubs subjected to water stress

  • M. Lopez-Carbonell
  • L. Alegre
  • A. Pastor
  • E. Prinsen
  • H. van Onckelen
Article

Abstract

Water stress induced an increase in endogenous concentrations of ABA in Lavandula stoechas L. plants to 13100 pmol ABA g−1 FW, which may contribute to the maintenance of water relations between the second and the third day of water stress treatment. After the third day, a sharp decrease in ABA levels was observed to 2630 pmol ABA g−1 FW, together with a decrease in water content and water potential and a loss of plant response to water stress. Water deficit did not induce an increase in endogenous ABA concentration, which remained at 514 pmol ABA g−1 FW in Rosmarinus officinalis L., which is more sclerophyllous than L. stoechas. Nevertheless, the relative water content of Rosmarinus officinalis L. after seven days of water stress decreased more than 40% and ψ reached values of −3.2 MPa. R. officinalis showed lower levels of ABA, but significantly higher levels of IAA and ZR than L. stoechas (4 times and 6 times respectively in well watered-plants). The increase in ABA levels is not a common mechanism in these two Mediterranean shrubs which survive under water stress conditions.

Key words

Lavandula stoechas Rosmarinus officinalis ABA IAA ZR water stress 

Abbreviations

ABA

abscisic acid

d

days of water stress treatment

DW

dry weight

FW

fresh weight

IAA

indole-3-acetic acid

RP

Reversed Phase

RWC

relative water content

TW

turgid weight

WC

water content

ZR

zeatin riboside

ψ

water potential

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Lopez-Carbonell
    • 1
  • L. Alegre
    • 1
  • A. Pastor
    • 1
  • E. Prinsen
    • 2
  • H. van Onckelen
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Plant Biology, Plant Physiology Unit, Faculty of BiologyBarcelona UniversitySpain
  2. 2.Department of BiologyUniversity of Antwerp (UIA)WilrijkBelgium

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