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Hydrobiologia

, Volume 207, Issue 1, pp 123–130 | Cite as

Oxygen profiles in intertidal sediments of Ria Formosa (S. Portugal)

  • Vanda Brotas
  • Ana Amorim-Ferreira
  • Carlos Vale
  • Fernando Catarino
Part Two: Water Sediment-Interaction

Abstract

Microelectrode oxygen profiles were measured in intertidal sediments from Ria Formosa (S. Portugal), a very productive shallow coastal lagoon. Four intertidal sampling sites were selected according to different sediment characteristics. Individual profiles revealed a high degree of lateral variability on a centimeter spatial scale. Nevertheless, consistent differences were observed between oxygen profiles measured in atmosphere-exposed and inundated intertidal sediments: in organically poor sand oxygen-penetration depth varied from 3 mm in inundated cores to more than 7 mm in exposed ones, while in organically rich muddy sand and mud it remained between 0.5–2.0 mm. The oxygen input from inundated to exposed conditions was estimated for each sampling site. Semi-diurnal tidal fluctuation, leading to periodical atmospheric exposure of sediments plays a major role in the oxygenation process of intertidal zones of Ria Formosa.

Key words

oxygen profiles sediment-water interface intertidal zones 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vanda Brotas
    • 1
  • Ana Amorim-Ferreira
    • 1
  • Carlos Vale
    • 2
  • Fernando Catarino
    • 1
  1. 1.Departamento de Biologia VegetalFaculdade de Ciências de LisboaLisboaPortugal
  2. 2.Instituto Nacional de Investigação des PescasLisboaPortugal

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