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Hydrobiologia

, Volume 204, Issue 1, pp 367–373 | Cite as

A model of seaweed growth in an outdoor culture in Israel

  • Michael Friedlander
  • Noya Galai
  • Hanan Farbstein
Cultivation, tissue culture and strain selection

Abstract

The agarophyte red seaweed Gracilaria conferta was used as a model plant to study the relationship between growth and environmental factors. This species was cultured in small outdoor tanks with continuous seawater supply during three years. Seaweeds were kept under constant density by weekly thinning and were also pulse-fed weekly with nitrogen and phosphate. Water temperature and underwater irradiance increase had opposite effects on the weekly growth rate in two seasons: negative in summer and positive in non-summer. Therefore, a dichotomic separation between summer (June–August) and non-summer (September–May) seasons was utilized in the proposed linear model. The linear model, of the analysis of covariance type, accounted for an explained percentage of total variation (R2) of 0.567, with significant coefficients of all variables included. A standardized model showed that season was the dominant variable, with its coefficient being twice that of temperature in summer, and zero in the non-summer season. Water temperature affected the growth rate twice as much as irradiance, and epiphytes showed a significant negative effect on growth only in the summer. This model aids in the prediction of growth on a seasonal basis under local conditions.

Key words

culture Gracilaria model seaweed 

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References

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael Friedlander
    • 1
  • Noya Galai
    • 2
  • Hanan Farbstein
    • 2
  1. 1.National Institute of OceanographyIsrael Oceanographic & Limnological ResearchHaifaIsrael
  2. 2.Statistical Consulting Unit, Dept. of StatisticsHebrew UniversityJerusalemIsrael

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