Plant Cell, Tissue and Organ Culture

, Volume 24, Issue 2, pp 139–158 | Cite as

The scale-up of plant cell culture: Engineering considerations

  • Ronald A. Taticek
  • Murray Moo-Young
  • Raymond L. Legge
Article

Abstract

The enormous versatility of plants has continued to provide the impetus for the development of plant tissue culture as a commercial production strategy for secondary metabolites. Unfortunately problems with slow growth rates and low products yields, which are generally non-growth associated and intracellular, have made plant cell culture-based processes, with a few exceptions, economically unrealistic. Recent developments in reactor design and control, elicitor technology, molecular biology, and consumer demand for natural products, are fuelling a renaissance in plant cell culture as a production strategy. In this review we address the engineering consequences of the unique characteristics of plant cells on the scale-up of plant cell culture.

Key words

bioengineering plant cell culture review scale-up 

Abbreviations

a

gas-liquid interfacial area per volume

C

dissolved oxygen concentration

C*

liquid phase oxygen concentration in equilibrium with the partial pressure of oxygen in the bulk gas phase

KL

overall mass transfer coefficient

kL

liquid film mass transfer coefficient

mO2

cell maintenance coefficient for oxygen

OTR

oxygen transfer rate

OUR

oxygen uptake rate

pO2

partial pressure of oxygen

STR

stirred-tank reactor

v.v.m.

volume of gas fed per unit operating volume of reactor per minute

X

biomass concentration

Yx/O2

biomass yield coefficient for oxygen

μ

specific growth rate

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ronald A. Taticek
    • 1
  • Murray Moo-Young
    • 2
  • Raymond L. Legge
    • 2
  1. 1.School of Chemical EngineeringCornell UniversityIthacaUSA
  2. 2.Biochemical Engineering Group, Department of Chemical EngineeringUniversity of WaterlooWaterlooCanada

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