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Plant Cell, Tissue and Organ Culture

, Volume 34, Issue 2, pp 183–190 | Cite as

Influence of the carbon source on growth and rosmarinic acid production in suspension cultures of Coleus blumei

  • Claudia Gertlowski
  • Maike Petersen
Original Research Papers

Abstract

Suspension cultures of Coleus blumei were characterized with respect to growth and rosmarinic acid formation in media with different sugars and various sugar concentrations. Sucrose is the sugar with the highest stimulating effect on growth and rosmarinic acid accumulation, followed by glucose and fructose. The sugar alcohol mannitol cannot be metabolized by the plant cells. Sucrose is cleaved into glucose and fructose by the Coleus cells. Sucrose concentrations from 1 to 5% have an increasing positive effect on growth and rosmarinic acid synthesis in the cell cultures with a maximum rosmarinic acid content of 12% of the dry weight in medium with 5% sucrose; in medium with 6% sucrose rosmarinic acid accumulation obviously did not reach its highest level in the culture period of 14 days. A very high yield of rosmarinic acid (2 mg ml-1 suspension) could also be achieved by maintaining a sucrose concentration of 2% during the whole culture period. The start of rosmarinic acid synthesis by the cell cultures seems to be regulated by the growth limitation when a nutrient, e.g. phosphate is depleted from the medium. The rate of rosmarinic acid accumulation is related to the amount of carbon left in the medium when growth ceases.

Key words

carbon source cell cultures Coleus blumei (Lamiaceae) culture medium rosmarinic acid secondary product formation 

Abbreviations

RA

rosmarinic acid

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Claudia Gertlowski
    • 1
  • Maike Petersen
    • 1
  1. 1.Institut für Entwicklungs-und Molekularbiologie der PflanzenHeinrich-Heine-Universität DüsseldorfDüsseldorf 1Germany

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