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New Forests

, Volume 9, Issue 3, pp 225–236 | Cite as

Root system morphology of Quercus rubra L. planting stock and 3-year field performance in Iowa

  • J. R. Thompson
  • R. C. Schultz
Article

Abstract

On 3 sites, 3-year performance of 1+0 northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.) seedlings was evaluated with respect to initial root system grade. Seven hundred twenty nursery-run bareroot northern red oak seedlings were graded according to numbers of large (>1mm) first-order lateral roots and outplanted in spring 1987 on eight 90-tree plots distributed among three sites in central Iowa. Survival, height growth, and diameter growth were significantly greater for seedlings with 10 or more large first-order lateral roots than for seedlings with 4 or fewer. Seedling survival and growth were significantly and positively related to initial root grade. First-year height growth, however, was significantly and negatively correlated with initial height. Combined results for seedling survival and growth indicated that red oak seedlings with five or more large first-order lateral roots have a greater probability of success both in terms of survival and early growth than do those with four or fewer first-order lateral roots.

Key words

First-order lateral roots hardwood seedling establishment northern red oak seedling root system morphology nursery grading procedures 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. R. Thompson
    • 1
  • R. C. Schultz
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of ForestryIowa State UniversityAmesU.S.A

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