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Photosynthesis Research

, Volume 25, Issue 3, pp 147–150 | Cite as

The use of chlorophyll fluorescence nomenclature in plant stress physiology

  • Olaf van Kooten
  • Jan F. H. Snel
Editorial Note

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References

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Olaf van Kooten
    • 1
  • Jan F. H. Snel
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. Plant Physiol. Res.Wageningen Agricultural UniversityWageningenThe Netherlands

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