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Hydrobiologia

, Volume 322, Issue 1–3, pp 199–204 | Cite as

Late- and postglacial history of lakes of the Karelian Isthmus

  • Natalia N. Davydoval
  • Khikmatulla A. Arslanov
  • Valentina I. Khomutova
  • Ivan I. Krasnov
  • Dmitry B. Malakhovsky
  • Matti Saarnisto
  • Alexandr I. Saksa
  • Dmitry A. Subetto
History of Lake Ladoga and Rates of Change in its Environment

Abstract

The Late Pleistocene and Holocene history of five lakes in the central part of Karelian Isthmus, south of the present Vuoksi River, are described on the basis of sediment stratigraphical investigations. Two of the Lakes, Michurinskoe (94 m a.s.l.) and Uzornoe (55 m a.s.l.) are situated in an upland area that remained dry land after the deglaciation even during the early high water stages of the Baltic Sea (Baltic Ice Lake until c. 10 000 yr BP and Ancylus Lake 9500–8800 BP). The low-lying central parts of the Isthmus were flooded by the outflow of Lake Ladoga that took place across this area until the formation of Neva River, c. 3 100 yr BP, and further by the waters of River Vuoksi that started flowing into the area from the NW c. 5000 yr BP as a new outlet of Lake Saimaa. The basins of the lakes Krasnoe and Vishnevskoe (both 16 m a.s.l.) became isolated when River Neva was formed and Lake Ladoga sank to its present level. Lake Rakovoe (12 m a.s.l.) was on the level of River Vuoksi up until the mid-19th century, when water level in the central stretch of the river was artificially lowered. Each of the lakes has been variously affected by hydrological and climatic changes and consequences of human activities, e.g. eutrophication due to intensified land use. As a consequence to artificial lowering, done in order to gain field and meadowland, the large, shallow Lake Rakovoe has been largely overgrown by macrophytic vegetation.

Key words

Lake sediments lake history Karelian Isthmus Vuoksi River 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Natalia N. Davydoval
    • 1
  • Khikmatulla A. Arslanov
    • 2
  • Valentina I. Khomutova
    • 1
  • Ivan I. Krasnov
    • 3
  • Dmitry B. Malakhovsky
    • 2
  • Matti Saarnisto
    • 4
  • Alexandr I. Saksa
    • 5
  • Dmitry A. Subetto
    • 1
  1. 1.Inst. of LimnologySt. PetersburgRussia
  2. 2.Inst. of GeographyUniversity of St. PetersburgSt. PetersburgRussia
  3. 3.Russian Geological InstituteSt. PetersburgRussia
  4. 4.Geological Survey of FinlandEspooFinland
  5. 5.Inst. of History of Material CultureSt. PetersburgRussia

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