New Forests

, Volume 12, Issue 1, pp 19–39

Soil water stress: Its effects on phenology, physiology, and morphology of containerized Douglas-fir seedlings

  • Shafiqur Rehman Khan
  • Robin Rose
  • Diane L. Haase
  • Thomas E. Sabin
Article

Abstract

Containerized Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii [Mirb.] Franco) seedlings were subjected to six moisture-stress treatments (ranging from 7 to 65% soil water content by volume) for 12 weeks. At the end of this period, there were significant differences in phenological, physiological, and morphological responses among the seedlings in the various moisture-stress treatments. In general, seedlings grown under very high or very low soil moisture conditions were adversely affected, while those grown under moderate conditions (29 to 53% soil water content) exhibited optimum growth, bud development, and nutrient and starch reserves. The use of vector analysis was found to be helpful in data interpretation. The results indicate the importance of closely monitoring nursery moisture regimes in order to achieve the best seedling quality.

Key words

vector analysis nursery irrigation seedling quality bud development 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shafiqur Rehman Khan
    • 1
  • Robin Rose
    • 1
  • Diane L. Haase
    • 1
  • Thomas E. Sabin
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Forest Science, College of ForestryOregon State UniversityCorvallisUSA

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