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Plant Molecular Biology

, Volume 24, Issue 5, pp 757–766 | Cite as

Differential expression of two calmodulin genes in response to physical and chemical stimuli

  • Jose R. Botella
  • Richard N. Arteca
Research Articles

Abstract

Two different calmodulin (CaM) cDNAs (MBCaM-1 and MBCaM-2) were isolated from a vigna radiata λgt 11 library by screening with a heterologous Arabidopsis cDNA probe (TCH-1). Both cDNAs are 85% homologous inside the coding region but are highly divergent outside this region. The polypeptides encoded by MBCaM-1 and MBCaM-2 are identical except for two conservative substitutions at positions 7 and 10. Southern analysis revealed that both cDNAs are encoded by different genes. Expression studies revealed different patterns of expression of both genes. MBCaM-1 mRNA exhibited a dramatic transient increase in response to touch, while MBCaM-2 expression showed a steady but small increase as compared to MBCaM-1. When plants were grown in complete darkness MBCaM-1 was undetectable and MBCaM-2 exhibited very low levels of expression. One hour after exposure of etiolated seedlings to light MBCaM-1 showed no change, while MBCaM-2 expression was increased. After a 6 h exposure to light there was an induction of both MBCaM-1 and MBCaM-2; however, the magnitude of this increase was much greater for MBCaM-2. When plants were grown under a 16 h light/8 h dark cycle the mRNA levels for MBCaM-1 were lower during the light period and increased during the beginning of the night cycle, while MBCaM-2 showed no change. Plants treated with indole-3-acetic acid had a peak in MBCaM-1 expression 6 h after treatment initiation with a slight decline 3 h after the peak, while MBCaM-2 showed a steady but small increase over time as compared to MBCaM-1. When plants were subjected to salt stress they showed an increase in MBCaM-1 expression 2 h after treatment initiation reaching a maximum after 4 h with no further increase after 6 h, while MBCaM-2 remained unchanged over the time course.

Key words

touch calcium indole-3-acetic acid salt stress light signal transduction Vigna radiata 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jose R. Botella
    • 1
  • Richard N. Arteca
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of HorticultureThe Pennsylvania State UniversityUniversity ParkUSA

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