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Photosynthesis Research

, Volume 34, Issue 3, pp 375–385 | Cite as

Regulation of Photosystem II

  • P. Horton
  • A. V. Ruban
Review Articles

Key words

Photosystem II chlorophyll fluorescence light-harvesting complex thylakoid membrane photoinhibition 

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References

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. Horton
    • 1
  • A. V. Ruban
    • 1
  1. 1.Robert Hill Institute, Department of Molecular Biology & BiotechnologyUniversity of SheffieldSheffieldUK

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