Plant Cell, Tissue and Organ Culture

, Volume 34, Issue 3, pp 279–285 | Cite as

Stable transformation of lettuce cultivar South Bay from cotyledon explants

  • A. C. Torres
  • D. J. Cantliffe
  • B. Laughner
  • M. Bienick
  • R. Nagata
  • M. Ashraf
  • R. J. Ferl
Article

Abstract

Transgenic plants of lettuce cultivar (cv.) ‘South Bay’ were produced by using Agrobacterium tumefaciens vectors containing the β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene and the NPT II gene for kanamycin resistance as a selectable marker. High frequency of transformation, based on kanamycin resistance and assays for GUS expression, was obtained with 24 to 72-h-old cotyledon explants cocultivated for 48 h with Agrobacterium tumefaciens. After the cocultivation period, the explants were placed in selection medium containing 50 or 100 mg l−1 of kanamycin, 100 mg l−1 cefotaxime and 500 mg l−1 carbenicillin for 10 days. Surviving explants were transferred every 14 days on shoot elongation medium. Progenies of R0 plants demonstrated linked monogenic segregation for kanamycin resistance and GUS activity.

Key words

Lactuca sativa regeneration tissue culture transgenic plant 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. C. Torres
    • 1
  • D. J. Cantliffe
    • 1
  • B. Laughner
    • 1
  • M. Bienick
    • 1
  • R. Nagata
    • 1
  • M. Ashraf
    • 1
  • R. J. Ferl
    • 1
  1. 1.Vegetable Crops DepartmentUniversity of Florida, IFASGainesvilleUSA
  2. 2.EMBRAPA/CNPHBrasiliaBrazil
  3. 3.Plant Molecular Biology CenterNorthern Illinois UniversityDeKalbUSA

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