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Plant and Soil

, Volume 168, Issue 1, pp 305–312 | Cite as

Concentrations of nutritional and trace elements in needles of Norway spruce (Picea abies [L.] Karst.) as functions of the needle age class

  • A. Wyttenbach
  • P. Schleppi
  • L. Tobler
  • S. Bajo
  • J. Bucher
Nutrient, Growth and Allocation

Abstract

The endogenous concentrations of the essential elements Ca, Cl, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, N, P and Zn, and of the nonessential elements Al, As, Ba, Br, Co, Cr, Cs, Hg, I, La, Na, Rb, Sb, Sc, Si and Sr were determined in 5 successive needle age classes. 40 mature spruce trees from 6 different sites were investigated individually. A given element usually shows smooth changes with the needle age class t. Trees on a given site usually have a similar dynamic behaviour. The same holds for the different site means. The concentrations can be approximated by functions c=f(t). Three different types of functions are required to describe the dynamic behaviour of 3 groups of elements that increase with t, and one for the elements that decrease with t. A given element usually can be described by the same type of function at all sites, even if its concentration differs widely. Exceptions are Mn, Co and Zn, which change from a decreasing function at low concentrations to an increasing function at high concentrations. Further irregulatities are found at some sites with Ca, Sr and Ba. These findings are corroborated by a multivariate statistical analysis.

Key words

needle age class Norway spruce nutrients Picea abies trace elements 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Wyttenbach
    • 1
  • P. Schleppi
    • 2
  • L. Tobler
    • 1
  • S. Bajo
    • 1
  • J. Bucher
    • 2
  1. 1.Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen PSISwitzerland
  2. 2.Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape ResearchBirmensdorfSwitzerland

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