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Hydrobiologia

, Volume 46, Issue 4, pp 435–443 | Cite as

Phytoplankton biomass and primary productivity of of Lake Leake and Tooms Lake, Tasmania

  • R. L. Croome
  • P. A. Tyler
Article

Abstract

Phytoplankton biomass and primary productivity were studied in two lakes in eastern Tasmania. Low standing crops (7–746 and 42–180 mm3m−3 for Lake Leake and Tooms Lake respectively) and low primary productivity (approx. 9 g C m−2 yr−1 for both lakes) indicate extreme oligotrophy. During a period when biomass remained constant in Lake Leake the hourly assimilation rate in constant light conditions varied seasonally, indicating physiological adjustment by the algae (“light adaptation”). The relationships between plankton biomass and carbon assimilation are discussed.

Keywords

Phytoplankton Activity Coefficient Phytoplankton Biomass Standing Crop Oligotrophic Lake 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Dr. W. Junk b.v. Publishers 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. L. Croome
    • 1
  • P. A. Tyler
    • 1
  1. 1.Botany DepartmentUniversity of TasmaniaUSA

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