Plant Molecular Biology

, Volume 10, Issue 3, pp 225–234

Agrobacterium-mediated inoculation of plants with tomato golden mosaic virus DNAs

  • J. Scott Elmer
  • Garry Sunter
  • William E. Gardiner
  • Leslie Brand
  • Charles K. Browning
  • David M. Bisaro
  • Stephen G. Rogers
Article

DOI: 10.1007/BF00027399

Cite this article as:
Elmer, J.S., Sunter, G., Gardiner, W.E. et al. Plant Mol Biol (1988) 10: 225. doi:10.1007/BF00027399

Abstract

We have adapted the “agroinfection” procedure of Grimsley and co-workers [4,5] to develop a simple, efficient, reproducible infectivity assay for the insect-transmitted, split-genome geminivirus, tomato golden mosaic virus (TGMV). Agrobacterium T-DNA vectors provide efficient delivery of both components of TGMV when used in mixed inoculation of wild-type host plants. A greater increase in infection efficiency can be obtained by Agrobacterium delivery of the TGMV A component to “permissive” transgenic plants. These “permissive” plants contain multiple tandem copies of the B component integrated into the host genome. An inoculum containing as few as 2000 Agrobacterium cells can produce 100% infection under these conditions. Further, our results show that there is a marked effect of the configuration of the TGMV A components within the T-DNA vector on time of symptom development. We have also found that transgenic plants carrying tandem copies of the A component do not complement the B component. Possible mechanisms to explain these results and the potential use of this system to further study the functions of the geminivirus components in infection are discussed.

Key words

geminivirus Agrobacterium tomato golden mosaic virus agroinoculation 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Copyright information

© Martinus Nijhoff Publishers 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Scott Elmer
    • 1
  • Garry Sunter
    • 2
  • William E. Gardiner
    • 2
  • Leslie Brand
    • 1
  • Charles K. Browning
    • 2
  • David M. Bisaro
    • 2
  • Stephen G. Rogers
    • 1
  1. 1.Plant Molecular Biology, Biological SciencesMonsanto CompanySt. LouisUSA
  2. 2.Department of Botany and Microbiology, Alabama Agricultural Experimental StationAuburn UniversityAuburnUSA
  3. 3.Department of Molecular Genetics and Ohio State Biotechnology CenterOhio State UniversityColumbusUSA

Personalised recommendations