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Plant Growth Regulation

, Volume 13, Issue 3, pp 231–239 | Cite as

Plant growth regulators and the orchid cut-flower industry

  • C.S. Hew
  • P.E. Clifford
Article

Abstract

Research involving plant growth regulators (PGRs) and orchids in areas of orchid growth and development are reviewed. For all areas covered in the review — seed germination and seedling growth, lateral shoot production, root production, flower initiation and development, postharvest physiology, and photosynthate partitioning — it was concluded that further studies would assist in clarifying potential uses for PGRs in the orchid cut-flower industry. It is suggested that extra PGR research on orchids is justified at the present time because of favourable prospects facing the orchid cut-flower industry.

Key words

cut flowers plant growth regulators plant hormones orchids review 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • C.S. Hew
    • 1
  • P.E. Clifford
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of BotanyNational University of SingaporeSingapore
  2. 2.Division of Cell and Experimental Biology, School of Biology and BiochemistryThe Queen's University of BelfastBelfastNorthern Ireland

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