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Plant Growth Regulation

, Volume 11, Issue 3, pp 277–291 | Cite as

Involvement of cytokinins in the germination of chick-pea seeds

  • N. Villalobos
  • L. Martin
Research Paper

Abstract

Eight cytokinins detected in germinated chick-pea (Cicer arietinum L. var. Castellana) seeds were first present in the embryonic axes but appeared in the cotyledons after 12h of germination. The cytokinins detected in the cotyledons originate in the embryonic axes, but no passage of these substances from the cotyledons to the axes was detected, except when the seeds were treated with red light.

It is concluded that the role played by the embryonic axis in mobilizating the main reserves of the cotyledons is mainly effected through these cytokinins. Both natural and synthetic cytokinins exert an important regulatory role in the hydrolysis of reserve proteins and calcium could be involved as an intermediate.

Key words

Cicer arietinum L. calcium cytokinins phytochrome reserve mobilization seed germination 

Abbreviations

BA

benzyladenine

cot.

cotyledon

(diH)Z

dihydrozeatin

(diH)ZR

dihydrozeatin riboside

GZR

glycosyl zeatin riboside

2iP

277-1

iPA

277-2 riboside

Kin

kinetin

Z

zeatin

ZG

zeatin glucoside

ZR

zeatin riboside

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. Villalobos
    • 1
  • L. Martin
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Plant Biology, Faculty of BiologyUniversity of SalamancaSalamancaSpain

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