Photosynthesis Research

, Volume 10, Issue 1–2, pp 51–62 | Cite as

Continuous recording of photochemical and non-photochemical chlorophyll fluorescence quenching with a new type of modulation fluorometer

  • U. Schreiber
  • U. Schliwa
  • W. Bilger
Regular Paper

Abstract

A newly developed fluorescence measuring system is employed for the recording of chlorophyll fluorescence induction kinetics (Kautsky-effect) and for the continuous determination of the photochemical and non-photochemical components of fluorescence quenching. The measuring system, which is based on a pulse modulation principle, selectively monitors the fluorescence yield of a weak measuring beam and is not affected even by extremely high intensities of actinic light. By repetitive application of short light pulses of saturating intensity, the fluorescence yield at complete suppression of photochemical quenching is repetitively recorded, allowing the determination of continuous plots of photochemical quenching and non-photochemical quenching. Such plots are compared with the time courses of variable fluorescence at different intensities of actinic illumination. The differences between the observed kinetics are discussed. It is shown that the modulation fluorometer, in combination with the application of saturating light pulses, provides essential information beyond that obtained with conventional chlorophyll fluorometers.

Key words

chlorophyll fluorescence fluorescence quenching fluorometer Kautsky effect photosynthesis 

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Copyright information

© Martinus Nijhoff Publishers 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • U. Schreiber
    • 1
  • U. Schliwa
    • 1
  • W. Bilger
    • 1
  1. 1.Institut für BotanikWürzburgFRG

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