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Euphytica

, Volume 33, Issue 3, pp 929–934 | Cite as

Inheritance of seed size in cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.)

  • I. Drabo
  • R. Redden
  • J. B. Smithson
  • V. D. Aggarwal
Article

Summary

The inheritance of seed weight in cowpea was examined in a field planting of the parents, reciprocal F1s, F2s and backcrosses to both parents of a cross between TVu 1977-OD (small seeded) and ACC 70002 (large).

Seed weight was inherited quantitatively and small seed was partially domiminant to large seed size. Gene action was predominantly additive but dominance and additive × additive epistatic effects were also significant.

Broad and narrow sense heritabilities were 85.1±5.3% and 75.4±18.6% respectively. The minimum number of loci involved in the inheritance of seed size was eight, and each gene pair contributed up to 1.02 g increase to seed weight. The estimate of genetic advance from F2 to F3 generations with 5% selection intensity was 3.58 g.

Index words

Vigna unguiculata cowpea seed size genetics additive dominance heritability 

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References

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Copyright information

© Dr. H. Veenman en Zonen B.V 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • I. Drabo
    • 2
    • 1
  • R. Redden
    • 3
    • 1
  • J. B. Smithson
    • 4
    • 1
  • V. D. Aggarwal
    • 2
    • 1
  1. 1.International Institute of Tropical Agriculture-IITAIbadanNigeria
  2. 2.International Institute of Tropical AgricultureAgriculture,Semi-Arid Food Grain Research and Development Pro-ject/National Cowpea Improvement ProgramOuagadougouUpper Volta
  3. 3.Hermitage Research StationDepartment of Primary IndustriesQueenslandAustralia
  4. 4.ICRISAT Center,Patan-cheruInternational Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT)A.P.India

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