Plant Molecular Biology

, Volume 23, Issue 4, pp 749–757

Constitutive or light-regulated expression of the rolC gene in transgenic potato plants has different effects on yield attributes and tuber carbohydrate composition

  • Matthias Fladung
  • Agim Ballvora
  • Thomas Schmülling
Research Articles

Abstract

Tetraploid potato clones, transgenic for the rolC gene of Agrobacterium rhizogenes under control of the light-inducible ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase small subunit promoter (rbcS-rolC), were compared, with respect to yield attributes and tuber carbohydrates, with transformed and untransformed controls and with 35S-rolC transgenic potato plants. In rbcS-rolC plants, the expression of the rolC gene was located mainly in leaves, while in 35S-rolC plants transcripts were detected as well in shoots and roots. Phenotypically, rbcS-rolC transgenic plants were found to be slightly reduced in plant size with a few more tillers than control plants. Photosynthetic rate and chlorophyll content were significantly lower in all rolC transgenic plants irrespective of the type of construct used. Tuber yield was not significantly different between controls and rbcS-rolC transgenic plants, but was reduced in the 35S-rolC transformants. Sucrose level was unchanged in all rolC clones investigated, whereas fructose content was significantly enhanced in 35S-rolC transformants, but not in the plants expressing the rolC gene in aerial plant parts only. In both types of rolC transgenic plants, glucose content was lower than in controls, resulting in a significant reduction of reducing sugar in tubers. The results suggest a hormonal influence on the carbohydrate composition of potato tubers.

Key words

reducing sugars rolC Solanum tuberosum transgenic potato tuberization 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Matthias Fladung
    • 1
  • Agim Ballvora
    • 1
  • Thomas Schmülling
    • 2
  1. 1.Max-Planck-Institut für Züchtungsforschung, Abteilung Pflanzenzüchtung und ErtragsphysiologieKölnGermany
  2. 2.Universität Tübingen, Lehrstuhl für Allgemeine GenetikTübingenGermany
  3. 3.Bundesforschungsanstalt für Forst- und HolzwirtschaftInstitut für ForstgenetikGrosshansdorfGermany

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