Hydrobiologia

, Volume 206, Issue 1, pp 29–38

Trichoptera and substrate stability in the Ochre River, Manitoba

  • D. G. Cobb
  • J. F. Flannagan
Article

Abstract

A total of 3999 Trichoptera adults, represented by 8 families, 17 genera and 33 species was collected in emergence traps in 1983 and 1984 from five stations on the Ochre River, Manitoba (50° 04′ N, 99° 48′ W). Species composition for the two years was comparable, but as the result of a summer spate in 1984, abundance was only 40% of that in 1983.

Species diversity by station was negatively correlated with substrate instability of the reach, whereas density per trap was negatively correlated with substrate instability and local factors such as sedimentation in some reaches following peak discharges. Analysis of historical peak discharge records indicated that relatively infrequent mid-summer spates had a detrimental effect on subsequent emergence of the Trichoptera fauna. The combination of spates and unstable stream bed substrate resulting from land use practices in the drainage basin have resulted in an impoverished caddisfly fauna in the Ochre River in comparison with other rivers in Manitoba.

Key words

trichoptera emergence substrate stability tractive force discharge 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. G. Cobb
    • 1
  • J. F. Flannagan
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Fisheries and OceansFreshwater InstituteWinnipegCanada

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