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Plant Molecular Biology

, Volume 15, Issue 5, pp 765–778 | Cite as

A root acyl carrier protein-II from spinach is also expressed in leaves and seeds

  • Katherine M. Schmid
  • John B. Ohlrogge
Article

Abstract

During the synthesis of fatty acids and their utilization in plastids, fatty acyl moieties are linked to acyl carrier protein (ACP). In contrast to previously cloned organ-specific ACP isoforms, we have now isolated a cDNA clone for a potentially constitutive ACP isoform from a spinach root library. Identity between the amino acid sequence encoded by this cDNA and N-terminal sequence data for ACP-II protein from spinach leaf indicates that the root cDNA encodes ACP-II. The deduced amino acid sequence for ACP-II shows 62% identity with spinach leaf ACP-I. Southern analysis suggests that multiple ACP genes or pseudogenes occur in the spinach genome. High-stringency northern blot analysis and RNase protection studies confirm that, within the region encoding the mature ACP-II, the cloned ACP sequence is expressed in leaves and seeds as well as in roots. Quantitative RNase protection data indicate that the ratio of ACP-I and ACP-II mRNA sequences in leaf is similar to the ratio of the two proteins.

Key words

acyl carrier protein differential expression fatty acid synthesis nuclear-encoded chloroplast proteins sequence homology Spinacia oleracea 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Katherine M. Schmid
    • 1
  • John B. Ohlrogge
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Botany and Plant PathologyMichigan State UniversityEast LansingUSA

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