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Plant and Soil

, Volume 146, Issue 1–2, pp 189–197 | Cite as

Inheritance studies of low-phosphorus tolerance in maize (Zea mays L.), grown in a sand-alumina culture medium

  • Álvaro Eleutério Da Silva
  • Warren H. Gabelman
  • James G. Coors
Article

Abstract

Inbred lines of maize selected as tolerant and intolerant to low-P stress using a sand-alumina culture medium were used to obtain F1 hybrids and advanced generations to be evaluated in diallel mating schemes and generation means analyses for the inheritance studies. Sand-alumina, a solid culture medium, which simulates a slow release, diffusion-limited P movement in soil solution was used in the inheritance studies. Tolerance to low-P stress conditions in maize seedlings is controlled largely by additive gene effects, but dominance is also important.

Key words

diallel low-P stress maize sand-alumina 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Álvaro Eleutério Da Silva
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Warren H. Gabelman
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • James G. Coors
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.EMBRAPA/CNPAFGoianiaBrazil
  2. 2.Department of HorticultureUniversity of WisconsinMadisonUSA
  3. 3.Department of AgronomyUniversity of WisconsinMadisonUSA

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