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Plant and Soil

, Volume 38, Issue 1, pp 125–143 | Cite as

Growth and nutrient uptake of coniferous seedlings: Comparison among 10 species at various seedbed densities

  • Norman A. Richards
  • Albert L. Leaf
  • Donald H. Bickelhaupt
Article

Summary

The evaluation of biomass production and uptake of N, P, K, Ca, and Mg for various plant components (roots, stems, and foliage) and totals by 10 species of 2-0 coniferous seedlings grown at a controlled range of densities in a highly productive forest nursery documents considerable differences among species and seedling parameters. The species are ranked by biomass and nutrient-element relationships on a unit area of seedbed basis, quantifying the magnitude of the differences among the species at the various density levels. The 10 species include Abies balsamea, Larix leptolepis, Picea abies, Picea glauca, Picea mariana, Picea pungens, Pinus resinosa, Pinus strobus, Pinus sylvestris, and Pseudotsuga menziesii.

Keywords

Biomass Nutrient Uptake Plant Physiology Unit Area Biomass Production 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Martinus Nijhoff Publishers 1973

Authors and Affiliations

  • Norman A. Richards
  • Albert L. Leaf
  • Donald H. Bickelhaupt

There are no affiliations available

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