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Plant and Soil

, Volume 171, Issue 1, pp 185–187 | Cite as

Cadmium and copper interactions on the accumulation and distribution of Cd and Cu in birch (Betula pendula Roth) seedlings

  • M. Gussarsson
  • S. Adalsteinsson
  • P. Jensén
  • H. Asp
Article

Abstract

The effect of different external cadmium (Cd) and copper (Cu) regimes on the concentration of Cd and Cu in roots and shoots of birch (Betula pendula Roth.) seedlings was investigated. The seedlings were grown for 12 days in a weak nutrient solution (containing all essential nutrient elements including 0.025 µM Cu) at pH 4.2 with combinations of additional 0–2 µM CdCl2 and 0–2 µM CuCl2. Root and shoot concentrations of Cu were decreased by Cd in all treatments which included 0.1–2 µM of additional Cu in the treatment solution. When no extra Cu was added, only the shoot concentration of Cu was decreased by Cd whereas the root concentration was not affected. The shoot concentration of Cd was decreased by 0.5 and 2 µM of additional Cu in the treatment solution. The root concentration of Cd was decreased by Cu only when the concentration of additional Cu in the treatment solution was equal to or exceeded the concentration of Cd.

Key words

Betula pendula solution culture translocation 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Gussarsson
    • 1
  • S. Adalsteinsson
    • 1
  • P. Jensén
    • 1
  • H. Asp
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of HorticultureSwedish University of Agricultural SciencesAlnarpSweden

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