Plant and Soil

, Volume 131, Issue 2, pp 225–228 | Cite as

Root biomass of a dry deciduous tropical forest in Mexico

  • J. Castellanos
  • M. Maass
  • J. Kummerow
Article

Abstract

The deciduous tropical dry forest at Chamela (Jalisco, Mexico) occurs in a seasonal climate with eight rainless (November through June) and four wet months (700 mm annual precipitation). The forest reaches a mean height of 10 m. Tree density in the research area was 4700 trees per ha with a basal area at breast height of 23 m2 per ha. The above-and below-ground biomass of trees, shrubs, and lianas was 73.6 Mg ha−1 and 31 Mg ha−1, respectively. A root:shoot biomass ratio of 0.42 was calculated. Nearly two thirds of all roots occur in the 0–20 cm soil layer and 29% of all roots have a diameter of less than 5 mm.

Key words

coarse roots fine roots root distribution root:shoot ratio 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Castellanos
    • 1
  • M. Maass
    • 1
  • J. Kummerow
    • 2
  1. 1.Centro de Ecologia, UNAMCiudad UniversitariaD.F., Mexico
  2. 2.Department of Biology and Systems Ecology Research GroupSan Diego State UniversitySan DiegoUSA

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