Plant and Soil

, Volume 128, Issue 1, pp 91–95 | Cite as

Nitrogen fixation at phyllospheric level in coniferous plants in Italy

  • F. Favilli
  • A. Messini
Article

Abstract

The results of a three year investigation on phyllospheric nitrogen fixation in Pinus nigra and Pseudotsuga menziesii growing in Central Italy are reported. The highest levels of nitrogen fixation in Pinus nigra and Pseudotsuga menziesii needles were reached during spring in three year old needles (from 6.1 to 7.6 and from 8.1 to 10.2 nmoles of N2 fixed h-1 g-1 needles) collected in the center of the canopy, while the lowest values (less than 1.5 and 3.0 nmoles of N2 fixed h-1 g-1 needles) were detected during summer in young needles collected in the lateral branches (areas more exposed to the light and with low humidity). Microorganisms belonging to the genera Pseudomonas, Bacillus, Achromobacter, Klebsiella and Mycobacterium were isolated from the needles of either Pinus nigra or Pseudotsuga menziesii.

Key words

nitrogen fixation phyllosphere Pinus nigra Pseudotsuga menziesii 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. Favilli
  • A. Messini
    • 1
  1. 1.Centro di Studio dei Microorganismi Autotrofi del CNRFirenzeItaly

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