Hydrobiologia

, Volume 211, Issue 1, pp 65–76

Colonization of a headwater stream during three years of seasonal insecticidal applications

  • J. B. Wallace
  • A. D. Huryn
  • G. J. Lugthart
Article

DOI: 10.1007/BF00008618

Cite this article as:
Wallace, J.B., Huryn, A.D. & Lugthart, G.J. Hydrobiologia (1991) 211: 65. doi:10.1007/BF00008618

Abstract

We investigated recolonization by insects of a small headwater stream in the southern Appalachian Mountains that was treated along its entire length with an insecticide (methoxychlor). Initial treatment (December 1985) resulted in massive insect drift. Applications continued seasonally for three years, and drift was measured during each treatment. Taxonomic composition of the drift indicated several responses: (1) Some taxa were eliminated. (2) A number of taxa occurred only sporadically following initial treatment. (3) Early instars for some taxa showed seasonal occurrences which closely paralleled known life cycles and flight periods of adults. Groups which provided strong evidence for aerial recolonization included several Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera (Peltoperlidae and Isoperla spp.), and Trichoptera (Parapsyche cardis, Diplectrona modesta, Pycnopsyche spp., and Lepidostoma spp.). (4) Some long-lived taxa survived and exhibited distinct growth through several treatment periods. These include Odonata (Lanthus and Cordulegaster), some Ephemeroptera, and some Diptera (Tipulidae, Ceratopogonidae, and Tanypodinae). (5) Some taxa which were not present at the time of initial treatment appeared during the experiment. Chironomidae dominated the drift in all samples, and the number of genera did not decrease during the three-year treatment period. Of the 27 chironomid genera identified, only Micropsectra decreased in proportional abundance during treatment. In contrast, several genera (Corynoneura, Meropelopia, Parametriocnemus, and Tvetnia) showed little change in relative abundance. Larsia (Tanypodinae) increased in proportional abundance during the treatment period.

Key words

insecticide disturbance stream insects life cycles colonization 

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. B. Wallace
    • 1
  • A. D. Huryn
    • 1
  • G. J. Lugthart
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of EntomologyUniversity of GeorgiaAthensUSA
  2. 2.Department of BiologyUniversity of AlabamaTuscaloosaUSA

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