Environmental Biology of Fishes

, Volume 32, Issue 1–4, pp 275–279

Stomach contents of Latimeria chalumnae and further notes on its feeding habits

  • Teruya Uyeno
  • Toshio Tsutsumi
Article

Synopsis

Stomach contents of three Latimeria chalumnae dissected in Japan support the hypothesis that the coelacanth is a predominantly nocturnal bottom or near-bottom drift feeder. Prey items identified in this study (Ilyophis brunneus, Cephaloscyllium sufflans and Beryx decadactylus) and those reported previously are mostly benthic or epibenthic dwellers. The drifting of the coelacanth in a headstanding posture would account for the easy capture of prey that moves within or just above the bottom strata at night.

Key words

Prey Benthic Epibenthic Nocturnal Piscivorous Drift feeder Headstand Bottom feeder Coelacanth Crossopterygii 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Teruya Uyeno
    • 1
  • Toshio Tsutsumi
    • 2
  1. 1.National Science MuseumTokyoJapan
  2. 2.Keikyu Aburatsubo Marine ParkMiuraJapan

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