Fish Physiology and Biochemistry

, Volume 13, Issue 6, pp 445–450 | Cite as

Variable versus constant temperature acclimation regimes: Effects on hemoglobin isomorph profile in goldfish,Carassius auratus

  • A. H. Houston
  • Julie H. Gingras-Bedard
Article

Abstract

Goldfish,Carassius auratus, were acclimated for 2 to 3.5 weeks to three temperature regimes: [1] temporally-constant (10, 20 and 30°C), [2] diurnally-cycling (20 ± 10°C) and [3] randomly-fluctuating (± 2°C at approximately 2h intervals between extremes of 10 and 30°C). No significant differences in hematocrit were evident. Hemoglobin levels in fish at constant 30°C and under randomly fluctuating temperature were significantly elevated. Of the three hemoglobin isomorphs observed, the two minor components (G1, G3) tended to decrease in relative abundance with increase in constant temperature, but increased under varying temperature regimes. The converse was true of the principal hemoglobin, G2. Extent of isomorph variation was correlated with extent of temperature variability. These observations confirm that temperature variability significantly effects thermoacclimatory response. The functional significance of changes in isomorph abundances during the acclimatory process is considered.

Keywords

goldfish rainbow trout thermal acclimation hemoglobin isomorphs 

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Copyright information

© Kugler Publications 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. H. Houston
    • 1
  • Julie H. Gingras-Bedard
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Biological SciencesBrock University St. CatherinesCanada

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