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Environmental Biology of Fishes

, Volume 45, Issue 3, pp 237–248 | Cite as

Geographical colour variation in cichlid fishes at the southern end of Lake Tanganyika

  • Masanori Kohda
  • Yasunobu Yanagisawa
  • Tetsu Sato
  • Kazuhiro Nakaya
  • Yasuo Niimura
  • Kazunori Matsumoto
  • Haruki Ochi
Article

Synopsis

Geographical colour variation and distribution of 48 common cichlid fish species were studied at 20 sites along an 85 km shoreline at the southern end of Lake Tanganyika, Africa. Sixteen species had two or more colour morphs and 11 species showed a limited distribution in the study area. They were all rock-dwellers. Distributional borders of the color morphs and species with a limited distribution mostly lay in two long sandy beaches, 7 and 13 km long. We suggest that the long sandy beaches can be effective barriers against dispersal of shallow-water rock-dwelling cichlid fishes.

Key words

Geographical barrier Isolation Sandy beaches Allopatric-speciation Dispersion 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Masanori Kohda
    • 1
  • Yasunobu Yanagisawa
    • 2
  • Tetsu Sato
    • 3
  • Kazuhiro Nakaya
    • 4
  • Yasuo Niimura
    • 5
  • Kazunori Matsumoto
    • 1
  • Haruki Ochi
    • 3
  1. 1.Laboratory of Animal Sociology, Department of Biology, Faculty of ScienceOsaka City UniversityOsakaJapan
  2. 2.Department of BiologyEhime UniversityMatsuyamaJapan
  3. 3.Center for Ecological ResearchKyoto UniversityOtsuJapan
  4. 4.Faculty of FisheriesHokkaido UniversityHakodateJapan
  5. 5.Jepro ForumBunkyo, TokyoJapan

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