Living Reference Work Entry

Handbook of Geomathematics

pp 1-22

Date: Latest Version

Simulation of Land Management Effects on Soil N2O Emissions using a Coupled Hydrology-Biogeochemistry Model on the Landscape Scale

  • Martin WlotzkaAffiliated withUniversity of Heidelberg, Interdisciplinary Center for Scientific Computing, Engineering Mathematics and Computing Lab Email author 
  • , Vincent HeuvelineaAffiliated withUniversity of Heidelberg, Interdisciplinary Center for Scientific Computing, Engineering Mathematics and Computing Lab
  • , Steffen KlattaAffiliated withUniversity of Heidelberg, Interdisciplinary Center for Scientific Computing, Engineering Mathematics and Computing Lab
  • , Edwin HaasbAffiliated withKarlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute of Meteorology and Climate Research
  • , David KrausbAffiliated withKarlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute of Meteorology and Climate Research
  • , Klaus Butterbach-BahlbAffiliated withKarlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute of Meteorology and Climate Research
  • , Philipp KraftAffiliated withInstitute of Landscape Ecology and Resources Management, Justus-Liebig-University of Giessen
  • , Lutz BreuercAffiliated withInstitute of Landscape Ecology and Resources Management, Justus-Liebig-University of Giessen

Agricultural soils are the primary anthropogenic source of atmospheric N2O. Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from soils are mainly the result of microbial processes such as nitrification/denitrification. These processes have a strong dependency on environmental factors like temperature, moisture, soil and vegetation properties, or the land management. Therefore, emissions occur with a high spatial and temporal variability giving rise to hot spots and hot moments. Quantifying sources and sinks of GHG like CO2, N2O, and CH4 for natural, agricultural, and forest ecosystems is crucial for our understanding of impacts of land management on the biosphere-atmosphere exchange of GHG and for the development of mitigation options. GHG exchange from soils is driven by complex microbial and plant nutrient turnover processes, and it is the net result of all physicochemical and biological processes involved in production, consumption, and transport. Process-oriented biogeochemical models are useful to ...

This is an excerpt from the content