Corpus Callosotomy

Abstract

The rationale for sectioning the corpus callosum to control generalized seizures rests on the tenets that seizures evolve in the cerebral cortex, secondarily spread through commissural pathways to the opposite cerebral hemisphere, and that therefore such generalization or bilateral synchronization can be reduced or eliminated by sectioning this main commissural bundle [1]. The corpus callosum, hippocampal commissure, and anterior commissure transmit interhemispheric discharges. The corpus callosum is by far the largest of the three, developing in proportion to the size and complexity of the neocortex and reaching maximal size in humans, where it contains somewhat on the order of 180 million axons [2]. The number of callosal connections varies from one cortical region to another.