Reference Work Entry

Encyclopedia of Applied Electrochemistry

pp 1428-1435

Date:

Organic Pollutants, Direct Electrochemical Oxidation

  • Christos ComninellisAffiliated withInstitute of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) Email author 
  • , Agnieszka KapałkaAffiliated withInstitute of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL)
  • , Stéphane FierroAffiliated withInstitute of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL)
  • , György FótiAffiliated withInstitute of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL)
  • , Pierre-Alain MichaudAffiliated withInstitute of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL)
  • , Petros Dimitriou-ChristidisAffiliated withEnvironmental Chemistry Modeling Laboratory, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL)

Introduction

Biological treatment of polluted water is the most economical process used for the elimination of “readily degradable” organic pollutants present in wastewater. The situation is completely different when the wastewater contains toxic and refractory (i.e., resistant to biological treatment) organic pollutants. One interesting possibility is to use a coupled process: partial oxidation–biological treatment. The goal is to decrease the toxicity and to increase the biodegradability of the wastewater before biological treatment. The optimization of this coupled process is complex, however, and complete mineralization of the organic pollutants is usually preferred.

The electrochemical method for mineralization of organic pollutants is a new technology and has attracted a great deal of attention recently. The technology is interesting for the treatment of dilute wastewater (COD < 5 g/l), and it is in competition with the process of chemical oxidation using strong oxidant ...

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