Reference Work Entry

Blaustein’s Pathology of the Female Genital Tract

pp 253-303

Carcinoma and Other Tumors of the Cervix

  • Agnieszka K. WitkiewiczAffiliated withDepartments of Gynecology, Obstetrics, Pathology and Oncology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Director of Gynecologic Pathology, The Johns Hopkins HospitalDepartment of Pathology, Thomas Jefferson University Email author 
  • , Thomas C. WrightAffiliated withDepartment of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College and New York Presbyterian HospitalDepartment of Pathology, Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center
  • , Alex FerenczyAffiliated withDepartment of Pathology, Johns Hopkins University School of MedicineJewish General Hospital, McGill University
  • , Brigitte M. RonnettAffiliated withDepartment of Pathology, Division of Gynecologic Pathology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
  • , Robert J. KurmanAffiliated withDepartments of Gynecology, Obstetrics, Pathology and Oncology, Division of Gynecologic Pathology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Abstract

The World Health Organization (WHO) recognizes three general categories of invasive carcinoma of the cervix: squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, and “other epithelial tumors” (Table 6.1 ) [278]. The “other epithelial tumors” include adenosquamous carcinoma, adenoid basal cell carcinoma, adenoid cystic carcinomas, as well as neuroendocrine tumors and undifferentiated carcinoma (Table 6.1 ) [278]. The relative frequency of these different tumor types varies between studies; in general, squamous cell carcinoma is the most common histologic subtype accounting for 70–80% of invasive carcinomas. Adenocarcinoma and adenosquamous carcinoma comprise 10–15% of all cases, and all others 10–15% [45, 245, 271].