Protocol

Advanced Methods in Structural Biology

Part of the series Springer Protocols Handbooks pp 241-273

Date:

Structural Biology with Microfocus Beamlines

  • Kunio HirataAffiliated withRIKEN/SPring-8 CenterJST/PRESTO Email author 
  • , James FoadiAffiliated withDiamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation CampusMembrane Protein Laboratory, Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus
  • , Gwyndaf EvansAffiliated withDiamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation CampusMembrane Protein Laboratory, Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus
  • , Kazuya HasegawaAffiliated withJASRI/SPring-8
  • , Oliver B. ZeldinAffiliated withDepartment of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Stanford University

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Abstract

Protein microcrystallography, which analyzes crystals smaller than a few tens of microns, is becoming one of the most attractive fields in structural biology. To realize the complete potential of this technique, it is inevitable that microcrystallography has to be combined with novel data collection instruments and strategies. Recently, a highly brilliant X-ray beam with micron size has enabled the measurement of diffraction data from such microcrystals (Smith JL, Fischetti RF, Yamamoto M, Micro-crystallography comes of age. Curr Opin Struct Biol 22:602–612, 2012). Here, we describe important instrumentation at synchrotron facilities and experimental strategies.

Keywords

Protein crystallography Microcrystals