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Microbial Carotenoids from Bacteria and Microalgae

Volume 892 of the series Methods in Molecular Biology pp 207-217

Date:

Carotenoids’ Production from Halophilic Bacteria

  • María de Lourdes MorenoAffiliated withDepartamento de Microbiología y Parasitología, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Sevilla
  • , Cristina Sánchez-PorroAffiliated withDepartamento de Microbiología y Parasitología, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Sevilla
  • , María Teresa GarcíaAffiliated withDepartamento de Microbiología y Parasitología, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Sevilla
  • , Encarnación MelladoAffiliated withDepartamento de Microbiología y Parasitología, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Sevilla Email author 

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Abstract

Carotenoids have received considerable attention due to their interesting industrial applications and, more importantly, their potential beneficial effects on human health. Halophiles comprise a heterogeneous group of microorganisms that need salts for optimal growth. The pigments produced by these halophilic organisms comprise phytoene, β-carotene, lycopene, derivatives of bacterioruberin, and salinixanthin. Here, we describe the procedure to obtain salinixanthin from the extremely halophilic bacterium Salinibacter ruber. Additionally, we describe the expression of the β-carotene biosynthetic genes crtE, crtY, crtI, and crtB from Pantoea agglomerans in the moderately halophilic bacterium Halomonas elongata obtaining a strain able to produce practically pure β-carotene. Thus, the use of these halophilic microorganisms as a source of carotenoids constitutes an important commercial alternative in the production of carotenoids from biological sources.

Key words

Carotenoid Salinixanthin β-Carotene crt genes Halophiles Salinibacter ruber Halomonas elongata Genetic engineering